London’s China Town isn’t too different to what you’d expect from any China Town.

DSC_0201But what I love about it is that it is so easy to navigate as it’s not large, yet has the advantage of providing everything Chinese.

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Expect amazing dim sum and Hong Kong-styled Cantonese roast duck, with your occasional bubble tea and bubble wrap shop, baked goods including fish-shaped custard-filled wafers and groceries selling delectable Asian fruit and vegetables, including Durian!

Here are some of my favourite pictures from London’s China Town.

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Chinese Roast Duck
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Cha Siu Bao
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Taiyaki Shells
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Taiyaki filled with custard
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Taiyaki filled with custard
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Chinese Buffet
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Fresh Durian and Jackfruit
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Chinese New Year Cakes made out of Sticky Rice
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Pokémon-themed Soft Drinks
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Elaborate cakes from China Town Bakery, London
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Fresh Dumplings

After spending too much time watching other people eat, life began to feel unbalanced, so I got myself a place at Joy King to eat some traditional Chinese. Food was great, service not so much as they pressure you into ordering without giving you ample time, and they serve you the bill before you’ve even finished. Also, they could do with friendlier waiters. Overall, I would rate it a 6, because the food was delicious but there’s room for improvement elsewhere.

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Dim Sum
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Roast Duck Broth with Noodles and Bok Choi

On one of the many days spent in Marylebone High Street, we decided to pop by Fischer’s Café and Konditorei.

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What makes Fischer’s interesting is that it serves typical Austrian food — an common occurrence in central London; and it’s designed to evoke 20th century Austria. You’ll notice they’ve done this well when, as soon as you’ve set foot in Fischer’s territory, it feels like a whole new era.

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You’ll quickly find yourself in a dim lit environment, with dark cherry wood, gold embellishments and dated paintings. You’ll notice two in particular: one which adorns the bar and another which dominates the main dining area, accompanied by Fischer’s very own branded clock.

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Open all day, serving breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner, waiters clad in a black and white uniform, dash from one table to other with plates of schnitzels, sausages and strudels.

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The last time I had schnitzel was a while ago, when I visited Austria. I had a ballot ticket for the prestigious New Year’s concert performed by the Viennese Philharmonic opera, in the grandeur of the Musikverein. In the winter cold, which bit like hell, we sought refuge in Austrian comfort food and relished the Austrian cakes and creamed coffees at our every turn.

When in Vienna, the one thing you can’t avoid is Weiner Schnitzel, Austria’s national dish – a pan fried dish (in lard) made from pounded veal (otherwise known as escalope), covered in breadcrumbs, served with lemon. You’d expect an Austrian restaurant to have nailed the national pride, so we decided to put our faith in Fischer’s and ordered the Weiner Schnitzel served with jus parisienne. As a side, we went for the Austrian Potato Salad, consisting of boiled potatoes with a mustard dressing, garnished with parsley. Both were very good, the Schnitzel cooked to perfection and the potato salad fresh yet creamy.

DSC_0898DSC_0902And whilst we were at it, we recognised that we could do with a second helping of potatoes!  Serving Gröstls und Röstis for brunch, we had a good feeling about the former, so we went for the classic bacon gröstl with a fried egg. Turns out this seemingly unpretenious dish had all the ingredients for contentment — it was a crunchy, savoury, egg-topped delight —  so much so that, it’s inspired me to cook it, one frosty morning. Watch this space for more on how to make the perfect bacon gröstl.  

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